Standard & Metrics

The Companies We Rate


Gender Fair’s proprietary methodology currently rates publicly traded, consumer-focused companies because companies on the public market must disclose information that privately held ones are not required to.

We choose around 15 of the largest, most commonly known companies for each industry. Some might be listed in more than one industry category where ratings can vary—although the corporate leadership and policies will be the same, different brands will have different marketing and philanthropy, which can affect their scores.

Most recently, we have begun rating private companies who share their data with us.

 

The Data We Use


We use the most recent information publicly available wherever possible, gathered from annual reports, corporate social responsibility reports, sustainability reports, and outside sources that are self-reported data from the company, not anonymous. More specifically, we consult PL+US for information on parental leave; Force the Issue for information on non-forced arbitration; Just Capital for information on equal pay; and Working Mother for information on parental leave and manager data. We evaluate marketing imagery of the last two years, and update rankings annually.

We take every effort to ensure the accuracy of the data, and contact each company to give them the opportunity to confirm. Individuals and companies are invited to submit a request for correction for any information they believe is in error, which is implemented within 30 days after verification.

If a foreign company has a U.S. division with its own executive committee and board, we will use the data for the U.S. division in our ratings. When rating foreign companies, we include their programs and policies in the U.S., and not in other markets.

 

Our Metrics


Gender Fair rates companies on metrics derived from the Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs) to ensure companies meet benchmark investments in gender equality—internally and in the communities they serve.

Launched in 2010 by UN Women & the United Nations Global Compact, the WEPs offer specific, measurable goals for gender equity.

Gender Fair rates companies on a 100 point index on 4 key areas:

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Leadership

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Employees

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Advertising

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Philanthropy

Leadership Score
We analyze a company’s commitment to advancing female leadership throughout its organization.

  • Are there leadership programs for women?
  • Does the percentage of women in the C-Suite or Executive Committee **meet or exceed the current benchmark of 14% (average in Fortune 500)?
  • Does the percentage of women on the Board meet or exceed the current benchmark of 20% (average in Fortune 500)?
  • Is the percentage of women of color on the board above the current benchmark of 5%?
  • Does the percentage of women in management meet or exceed the current benchmark of 40% (average according to US Government Accounting Agency)? Note: Management figures are self-reported, and definitions may vary.

**We use the number provided to the SEC of the highest paid executives. For non-US companies where that data is not available we count the executives with the word Chief in their titles, and if that is not applicable, we use the company’s listing of top executives.

Employee Score
We analyze a company’s ability to provide a human-friendly working environment for employees.

  • Does the paid maternity leave meet or exceed the current benchmark of 12 weeks?
  • Does the paid paternity leave meet or exceed the current benchmark of six weeks?
  • Does the company report on the diversity of its employees?
  • Does the company have family-friendly programs or policies, such as onsite childcare, breast milk shipping and lactation rooms?
  • Has the company published a gender pay gap audit?
  • Does the company have any of the following in regards to sexual harassment: a third party ethics hotline, ombuds, a non-retaliation policy or non-forced arbitration?

Advertising Score
We analyze a company’s efforts to portray women in a way that breaks stereotypes in its marketing.

  • 20 | A brand receives 20 points if any single one of its ads depicts a man or a woman breaking a gender stereotype such as a man playing with a baby or a woman hiking alone.
  • 10 | A brand receives 10 points if the advertising is neutral.
  • 0 | A brand receives 0 points if a man or a woman is shown as a victim of any violence or is dressed in clothing that is not typical or relevant to the activity such as a woman wearing a bathing suit in a supermarket.

Philanthropy Score
We analyze a company's commitment to aiding women in their community and beyond.

  • Does the company report diversity in its supply chain?
  • Does the company/brand have community-based programs that focus on women specifically? Is this program national?
  • Does the company publish the financial contributions to its women-focused programs?
  • Does the company have a nationally or internationally-focused community/philanthropic program for women?
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